For your post, consider the following scenario: Your friend and teacher co-worker, Mrs. Summer is planning a unit for her economics class. She wants to plan an engaging lesson that will explore the co

 For your post, consider the following scenario: Your friend and teacher co-worker, Mrs. Summer is planning a unit for her economics class. She wants to plan an engaging lesson that will explore the concepts of supply and demand. She knows she wants to take advantage of either an inquiry-, project-, or problem-based instructional activity but is not quite sure what would work best.

 In your post, discuss the considerations you would share with Mrs. Summer. What questions should she answer before she proceeds? What factors does Mrs. Summer need to examine before designing her activity? How would you advise Mrs. Summer to proceed in her decision-making and what steps would be important for her instructional design? What technology inclusion could she consider?

 When you reply to your peers, check to ensure that the respective strengths or challenges of a specific approach are included in the post. It is not necessary for the post to address all three approaches, but your peer should demonstrate evidence of careful thoughtfulness of the scenario. Does the post make a reasonable attempt to aid Mrs. Summer in her instructional design? back up your wring with practical examples

Reference

1. Guido. M. (2017, January 19). What is inquiry-based learning: 7 benefits & strategies you need to know. Prodigy. https://www.prodigygame.com/blog/inquiry-based-learning-definition-benefits-strategies/

  • Please read through this web page. Developed in the 1960s, many teachers see inquiry-based learning as a new pedagogy. meaning they have questions about how to use it and if it’s worthwhile. Like problem-based learning, proponents state that letting students investigate solutions to open questions has a range of advantages. But the pedagogy must be shaped by research-backed approaches to reap these advantages. The site provides a thoughtful definition and includes benefits and strategies for implementing inquiry-based learning activities in the classroom.

2. Higgins, S., Xiao, Z., & Katsipataki, M. (2012). The impact of digital technology on learning: A summary for the Education Endowment Foundation.  Education Endowment Foundation. https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/public/files/Presentations/Publications/The_Impact_of_Digital_Technologies_on_Learning_(2012).pdf

  • Pages 1-52. The aim of this review is to present a synthesis of the evidence from meta-analysis about the impact of the use of digital technology in schools on children’s attainment, or more widely the impact of digital technology on academic achievement. It is divided up into three main sections. The first sets out an overview of the wider research into the impact of technology on learning to set the context and the rationale for the value of this information. The next section reviews the evidence from meta-analysis and other quantitative syntheses of research into the impact of digital technology. A further section looks at trends in the use of digital technology and learning in the UK and internationally, to provide further context for the recommendations which follow. The purpose of this review is to identify implications for future investment in the use of digital technology for learning in schools.

3. IBL, PBL and PJBL, what’s the difference? (n.d.). Kimberlin Education. http://kimberlineducation.com/ibl-pbl-and-pjbl-whats-the-difference/. 

  • This website provides a brief overview of the three different types of learning models.

4. Inquiry-based learning: An approach to educating and inspiring kids. (2016). Education Development Center. http://youthlearn.org/wp-content/uploads/Inquiry_Based_Learning.pdf 

  • Pages 1-11. This resource explains some of the key principles of inquiry-based learning and offers step-by-step information on how to create an inquiry-based project. In the traditional framework, teachers come to class with highly structured curricula and activity plans, sometimes referred to as “scope and sequence.” Teachers act as the source of knowledge and as the person who determines which information is important. In contrast, inquiry-based learning projects are driven by students. Instructors act more as coaches, guides, and facilitators who help learners arrive at their “true” questions—the things they really care about. When students choose the questions, they are motivated to learn and they develop a sense of ownership about the project.

5. Introduction to project-based learning. (n. d.). http://www.leadingpbl.org/f/Introduction+to+PBL+-+Handbook.pdf

  • Pages 1-7. Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging, and complex question, problem, or challenge. Students work on a project from a week up to a semester that engages them in solving a real-world problem or answering a complex question. They demonstrate their knowledge and skills by developing a public product or presentation for a real audience.

6. Larmer, J. (2015, July 13). Project-based learning vs. problem-based learning vs. X-BL. edutopia. https://www.edutopia.org/blog/pbl-vs-pbl-vs-xbl-john-larmer.

  • This article discusses the different types of “case” based learning and where they fall under the big umbrella of Inquiry-based Learning. The advantages to using these different learning models are also addressed.

7. Newman, M. J. (2005). Problem-based learning: An introduction and overview of the key features of the approach. Journal Veterinary, 32 (1), 12- 20. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7902006_Problem_Based_Learning_An_introduction_and_overview_of_the_key_features_of_the_approach 

  • Pages 12-18. This article provides background to teaching approaches founded in problem-based learning. In this particular article, the focus is on the education of veterinarian medicine but is useful for secondary education teachers as well. Problem-based learning has been adopted in educational programs in a variety of disciplines. There is a voluminous literature on the subject, but it often remains unclear just what is being done in the name of problem-based learning, and different accounts highlight different, often contradictory, positions on the key features of the approach. Similarly, despite the many claims made for the advantages of problem-based learning, the evidentiary basis of such claims is often questionable. This article provides an introductory overview of what appear to be the key features of the approach and a brief summary of empirical evidence on its effectiveness.

8. Reimaging the role of technology in education: 2017 National education technology plan update. (2017). Office of Educational Technology.  https://tech.ed.gov/files/2017/01/NETP17.pdf 

  • Pages 28-40: Chapter 2, Teaching with Technology. Educators will be supported by technology that connects them to people, data, content, resources, expertise, and learning experiences that can empower and inspire them to provide more effective teaching for all learners. The article includes descriptions of educator roles and examples of how technology can play an integral part in classroom instruction.