memoir

If you choose the Memoir option, feel free to draw inspiration from either or both these two authors in order to write your own memoir, but keep in mind that a memoir is not the same as an autobiography, although it is based on personal experience. Definitions differ, but a common feature is that memoirs do NOT encompass an entire life but refer to a chosen segment or phase. The main focus can be on the writer herself/himself, but it can also focus on parents, grandparents, siblings, teachers or other significant people, places or things in the author’s experience.  This kind of writing can make use of first and third person voice, but it should avoid second person. All narrated events should be true (i.e., they actually happened) to the best of your knowledge. Both narration/description and interpretation/reflection should be included. However, keep in mind the distinction between “showing” and “telling” in the narrative part(s) of your work. It is also important to keep in mind that a memoir should be more “literary” in its use of language and style than a standard college essay–as demonstrated–in very different ways–by Welty and Wright. It should NOT begin with a topic sentence, or end with a tidy conclusion, like an English 111 or 151 essay. If there is a thesis, it should emerge implicitly from the story rather than be stated explicitly.
IT CAN BE ABOUT YOUR LIFE OR A MADE UP STORY ABOUT SOMEONES LIFE. TEACHER DOESNT KNOW ME 
PERSONALLY SO IT CAN BE ABOUT WHO EVER JUST NEED IT DONE, THANK YOU!