Quantitative Analysis: Variables, Z Scores, Population, and Output

Use the
hsbdata.sav file to do these problems with one or more of these variables: math
achievement, mother’s education, ethnicity, and academic track. Use Tables 3.2,
3.3, and the instructions in the text to produce the appropriate plots or
descriptive statistics. Be sure that the plots and/or descriptive statistics
make sense (i.e. that they are a “good choice” or “OK”) for the variable. Document will be turn in to turnit in.com 

 

3.1.
Create bar charts. Discuss why you did or did not create a bar chart for each
variable.

 

3.2.
Create histograms. Discuss why you did or did not create a histogram for each
variable.

 

3.3.
Create frequency polygons. Discuss why you did or did not create a frequency
polygon for each variable. Compare the plots in Extra SPSS Problems 3.1, 3.2,
and 3.3.

 

3.4.
Compute the range, standard deviation, and skewness. Discuss which measures of
variability are meaningful for each of the four variables.

 

3.5.
Compute the mean, median, and mode. Discuss which measures of central tendency
are meaningful for each of the four variables.

 

Make Sure to:

 

1.     
Attach
your word document for review 

2.      Write the problem
number and the problem title as a level one heading (Example ‐ A.1.1: Chapter
2, Problem 2.1, and then provide your
response.

3.      Use level two headings
with short titles
for multi part questions (Example
‐ A1.1.a, Short Title,
A1.1.b, Short Title II, etc.)

4.      Use appropriate level headings for key elements
of your discussion such as Research Questions, Hypotheses, Descriptive
Statistics, Assumptions & Conditions, Interpretation, Results, and others.
Your goal is to make your analysis easy to follow and logical.

5.     
Ensure
that all tables and graphs are legible and include a figure number.

6.      Carefully review
your document prior to submission for formatting, flow, and readability. Keep
in mind that running the statistical tests is only the first half of the
challenge; you must be able to clearly communicate your findings to the reader.

Morgan, G. A., Leech, N., Gloeckner, G., & Barrett, K. (2020). IBM SPSS for introductory statistics (6th ed.). Routledge.